Sepharad as Imagined Community: Language, History and Religion from the Early Modern Period to the 21st Century (Studies in Judaism)

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کتاب سفاراد به مثابه جامعه خیالی: زبان، تاریخ و دین از دوره اولیه مدرن تا قرن بیست و یکم (مطالعاتی در یهودیت) نسخه زبان اصلی

دانلود کتاب سفاراد به مثابه جامعه خیالی: زبان، تاریخ و دین از دوره اولیه مدرن تا قرن بیست و یکم (مطالعاتی در یهودیت) بعد از پرداخت مقدور خواهد بود
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توضیحاتی در مورد کتاب Sepharad as Imagined Community: Language, History and Religion from the Early Modern Period to the 21st Century (Studies in Judaism)

نام کتاب : Sepharad as Imagined Community: Language, History and Religion from the Early Modern Period to the 21st Century (Studies in Judaism)
عنوان ترجمه شده به فارسی : سفاراد به مثابه جامعه خیالی: زبان، تاریخ و دین از دوره اولیه مدرن تا قرن بیست و یکم (مطالعاتی در یهودیت)
سری :
نویسندگان : ,
ناشر : Peter Lang Inc., International Academic Publishers
سال نشر :
تعداد صفحات : 334
ISBN (شابک) : 9781433131370 , 9781433139253
زبان کتاب : English
فرمت کتاب : pdf
حجم کتاب : 5 مگابایت



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فهرست مطالب :


Cover\nContents\nChapter One: Sepharad as Imagined Translocal Mediterranean Community: Introduction (Mahir Şaul and José Ignacio Hualde)\n 1. Sepharad Imagined as Community\n 1.1 The Language\n 2. Organization of the Book\n 2.1. The Early Period: From the Fifteenth to the Nineteenth Century\n 2.2. Fin de Siècle Judeo-Spanish Language, Literature and Culture\n 2.3. Judeo-Spanish Language and Culture Today\n Notes\n References\nPart One: The Origins: From the Fifteenth to the Nineteenth Century\n Chapter Two: An Overlooked 15th Century demand d’amor in Hebrew alxamía: Parma Biblioteca Palatina 2666, folio 207 verso (John Zemke)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. The Manuscript\n 3. Transcription and English Translation\n 4. Vocabulary\n 5. Verse\n 6. Dramatis personae and peripeteia\n 7. Memorial Book\n Appendix A: Transcription of Hebrew Characters\n Appendix B: Cancionero de baena 369–372\n Notes\n References\n Chapter Three: How Old Is Ladino Literature? (Olga Borovaya)\n Abstract\n 1. Language or Register?\n 2. Rupture or Continuity?\n Notes\n References\n Chapter Four: Historical Overview and Outcome of Three Portuguese Patterns in Judeo-Spanish: quer(em)-se + part. in Active Constructions, the wh-operator o que, and the Inflected Infinitive (Aldina Quintana)\n Abstract\n 1. Historical and Social Background\n 2. Dialectal Contact among Portuguese and Castilian/Judeo-Spanish Speakers\n 2.1. Se k(i)ere + participle (part.) in Impersonal Constructions\n 2.2. The o que wh-operator\n 2.3. The Inflected Infinitive\n 3. Conclusion\n Notes\n Primary Judeo-Spanish Sources\n References\n Chapter Five: The Syntactic Structure of Liturgical Ladino: Construct State Nominals, Multiple Determiners, and Verbless Sentences (Matthew Maddox)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. Methodology and corpus\n 2.1. The Haggadah\n 2.2. Corpus\n 3. Theoretical Background\n 3.1. The Minimalist Program (MP) and the Modelling of Syntactic Architecture\n 3.2. A Minimalist Model of the Bilingual Language Faculty\n 4. Extension of the Bilingual Language Faculty Model to LL\n 4.1. Construct State Nominals (Gesenius 1910: 247; Seow 1995: 116)\n 4.2. Multiple Determiners/Definiteness Agreement (DA) in DPs\n 4.3. Verbless Sentences\n 5. Conclusion\n Notes\n References\n Primary\n Secondary\n Chapter Six: Ke Haber/Ne Haber: Linguistic Interference, Cross-Meaning, and Lexical Borrowing between Ottoman Turkish and Judeo-Spanish (Pamela Dorn Sezgin)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. Hypothesis and Research Design\n 2.1. Hypothesis\n 2.2. Methodology\n 2.3. Sources\n 3. Historic and Sociolinguistic Context\n 4. Language Interference and Lexical Borrowing\n 5. Proverbs and Shared Meanings\n 6. Conclusions\n Notes\n References\nPart Two: Fin de siècle Judeo-Spanish Language, Literature and Culture\n Chapter Seven: Networks of Patronage and the Making of Two Ladino Newspapers (Matthias B. Lehmann)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. Two Ladino Autobiographies\n 3. Plotlines\n 4. From Saadi’s Anticlericalism to Carmona’s Secularism\n 5. Networks of Patronage\n Notes\n References\n Chapter Eight: Itzhak Benveniste and Reina Hakohén: Narrative and Essay for Sephardic Yout (Elisa Martín Ortega)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. Reina Hakohén and Izhak Benveniste\n 3. Narrative, Ideological and Linguistic Features of Konfidensyas de un amigo\n 4. Conclusion\n Notes\n References\n Chapter Nine: The Invention of Eastern Judeo-Spanish: The Betrayals of Spanish in the Re-romanization Process (End of 19th Century) and Its Consequences (Marie-Christine Bornes Varol)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. Changes in Judeo-Spanish Language and Language Contacts\n 3. The Re-romanization Process\n 4. Corpus and Samples\n 5. Graphical Problems\n 6. Complicating Re-analyses: The Case of French -duire Verbs\n 7. Poner, meter and pozar\n 8. Confusing Infinitive Forms, Paradigms and Groups of Conjugation\n 9. The Worries of Diphthongization\n 10. Conclusion\n Appendix\n Notes\n References\n Chapter Ten: Salomon Israel Cherezli’s Nuevo chico diccionario judeo-español–francés (Jerusalem 1898–1899) as a Judeo-Spanish Monolingual Dictionary (Aitor García Moreno)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. Judeo-spanish Monolingual Dictionaries\n 3. Nuevo chico diccionario judeo-español–francés Brief Description\n 4. Monolingual Definitions in the Text\n 4.1. Delimitation Problems\n 4.2. Recurring Patterns\n 4.3. Special Examples\n 4.4. Functions\n 5. Concluding Remarks\n Notes\n References\n Chapter Eleven: The Creation of the State of Israel and Its Impact on the Self-Image of the Sephardim, as Reflected in Judeo-Spanish Parodic War Haggadahs (Eliezer Papo)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. Polemical Haggadahs\n 3. War Haggadahs\n 4. Group’s Self-Image in the War Haggadah Parodies which Preceded the Creation of the State of Israel and in Leon’s “New Haggadah”\n 4 .1 . The People of Israel in the Passover Haggadah\n 4 .2 . Group Self-Image in the War Haggadahs which Preceded the Creation of the State of Israel\n 4 .3 . The Perception of Israel in Leon’s “New Haggadah”\n Notes\n Sources\n References\n Chapter Twelve: The Hispanic Legacy and Sephardic Culture: Sephardim and Hispanists in the First Half of the 20th Century (Paloma Díaz-Mas)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. Sephardic Studies within Romance Philology\n 3. The Sephardic maskilim and Hispanism\n 4. Ángel Pulido’s Hispanophile Correspondents\n 5. The Sephardim and Menéndez Pidal’s Studies on the Spanish Ballads\n 5.1. The Collaboration Between Ramón Menéndez Pidal and José Benoliel\n 5.2. The Junta para Ampliación de Estudios and Manuel Manrique de Lara’s Fieldwork\n 5.3. Américo Castro and His Contact with the Sephardim of Morocco\n 5.4. The Sephardim in the Project Archivo de la Palabra y de las Canciones Populares\n 6. Sephardim and Hispanists in the United States\n 7. Conclusion\n Notes\n References\nPart Three: Judeo-Spanish Language and Culture Today\n Chapter Thirteen: Contemporary Judeo-Spanish Poetry in Its Rediscovery of the Past (Agnieszka August-Zarębska)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. Poetic Recollections of Places\n 3. The Poetic Portraits of Persons and the Reminiscences of the Sound of Ladino\n 4. Conclusion\n Notes\n References\n Chapter Fourteen: En tierras virtualas: Sociolinguistic Implications for Judeo-Spanish as a Cyber-vernacular (Rey Romero)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. Language Domains and Cyber-vernaculars\n 3. Judeo-Spanish Online Communities\n 4. Methodological Considerations for Linguistic Research in Online Communities\n 5. Change and Variation in Digital Homelands: Using Data from Ladinokomunita\n 6. Conclusion: En tierras virtualas yo vo segir\n References\n Chapter Fifteen: Judeo-Spanish on the Web (Ana Stulic / Soufiane Rouissi)\n Abstract\n 1. Introduction\n 2. The Problem\n 3. Methodological Considerations\n 4. Judeo-Spanish on the Web: Results of the Research\n 4.1. Formal Identification of Languages\n 4.2. Presence of Judeo-Spanish on the Web\n 5. Conclusions and Perspectives\n Notes\n References\nIndex of Personal Names\nIndex of Subjects




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